Videos showing Tesla’s Smart Summon feature doing bizarre things have gotten the NHTSA’s attention (TSLA)

  • The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is looking into Tesla's Smart Summon feature, Bloomberg's Dana Hull first reported.
  • Smart Summon allows Tesla vehicles with the most robust version of the Autopilot driver-assistance system to drive in parking lots without anyone in the car.
  • NHTSA is aware of reports related to Smart Summon and is communicating with Tesla, a NHTSA representative told Business Insider.
  • "Safety is NHTSA's top priority and the agency will not hesitate to act if it finds evidence of a safety-related defect," the representative said.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is looking into Tesla's Smart Summon feature, Bloomberg's Dana Hull first reported.

Smart Summon allows Tesla vehicles with the most robust version of the Autopilot driver-assistance system to drive in parking lots without anyone in the car. Owners must be able to see their vehicle to use the feature and are responsible for the vehicle's actions, Tesla has said.

Read more: I spent a weekend with Tesla's Model 3. It was the most fun I've had driving a car, but Autopilot made me nervous.

NHTSA is aware of reports related to Smart Summon and is communicating with Tesla, a NHTSA representative told Business Insider.

"Safety is NHTSA's top priority and the agency will not hesitate to act if it finds evidence of a safety-related defect," the representative said.

Tesla did not immediately respond to Business Insider's request for comment.

See also: Apply here to attend IGNITION: Transportation, an event focused on the future of transportation, in San Francisco on October 22

Since Summon began to roll out as part of a software update last week, some Tesla owners have expressed excitement about the feature's performance, while others have posted videos showing the feature malfunctioning.

Tesla has attracted controversy over the ways it has marketed and discussed self-driving technology. The electric-car maker's CEO, Elon Musk, has said the company will have autonomous-driving technology that requires no human intervention ready by the end of next year, a more aggressive timeline than those announced or suggested by other auto or tech companies.

Musk has also ignored Tesla's guidelines for customers when using Autopilot — which can control steering, accelerating, and braking in some circumstances, but requires the driver to keep his hands on the wheel and eyes on the road — on television.

Read Bloomberg's full story here.

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